Szemeteskukának használjuk a tengeri állatokat

Elképesztő, felkavaró alkotásokkal mutatja meg a Természetvédelmi Világalap (WWF), hogy micsoda pusztítást végez az emberi szemét a világ tengereiben.

Évente több, mint 8 millió tonna szemetet juttatunk a tengerekbe, óceánokba, és ennek az állatok látják legnagyobb kárát.

** Please contact Christian Waters at waters@h20designsbeijing.com - he would like to add some details to our story** In an attempt to increase awareness for the plight of marine animals, WWF has launched a campaign entitled “The Price of Convenience” in collaboration with photographer Christian Waters, to show people exactly what happens to their trash when they’re done with it. In an interview with Refinery29, Waters explained why he was so compelled to draw attention to this problem: “People are basically using the oceans as their trash cans. I thought, maybe I can make a difference and try to create something that will help people change their lives and change how they act towards the creatures in the sea.” On a recent snorkeling expedition to Malaysia, Waters and his girlfriend were admiring the pristine blue sky and crystal-clear sea, when they began to notice pieces of trash floating around in the water. In addition to this distressing sight, Waters had also recently watched “a graphic and emotionally wrenching” video of someone attempting to remove a bendy straw from the nose of a sea turtle. “In such beautiful scenery, (the trash is) something so vile that just disrupts it,” Waters said. “I knew it only takes one piece of trash to kill one piece of wildlife, and it made me really upset.” Waters’ images are both stunning and horrifying, adding the perfect touch of urgency to WWF’s ad campaign. The pictures have now been displayed on billboards throughout Beijing, the capital city of China. Given that scientists believe there are now at least three major trash islands in the Pacific Ocean alone, this project could not be more important or timely. The campaign’s tagline, “Responsibility Changes Pollution,” reminds each one of us of the pivotal role that we have to play in changing the situation.

Christian Walters a Photoshop segítségével próbálta megmutatni, hogy felelőtlen magatartásunkkal tulajdonképpen kukának használjuk a vizeket, és a benne élő állatokat. Ha már ők beszélni nem tudnak,a fotós úgy döntött, megmutatja helyettük, mi folyik ma a nagyvilágban.

** Please contact Christian Waters at waters@h20designsbeijing.com - he would like to add some details to our story** In an attempt to increase awareness for the plight of marine animals, WWF has launched a campaign entitled “The Price of Convenience” in collaboration with photographer Christian Waters, to show people exactly what happens to their trash when they’re done with it. In an interview with Refinery29, Waters explained why he was so compelled to draw attention to this problem: “People are basically using the oceans as their trash cans. I thought, maybe I can make a difference and try to create something that will help people change their lives and change how they act towards the creatures in the sea.” On a recent snorkeling expedition to Malaysia, Waters and his girlfriend were admiring the pristine blue sky and crystal-clear sea, when they began to notice pieces of trash floating around in the water. In addition to this distressing sight, Waters had also recently watched “a graphic and emotionally wrenching” video of someone attempting to remove a bendy straw from the nose of a sea turtle. “In such beautiful scenery, (the trash is) something so vile that just disrupts it,” Waters said. “I knew it only takes one piece of trash to kill one piece of wildlife, and it made me really upset.” Waters’ images are both stunning and horrifying, adding the perfect touch of urgency to WWF’s ad campaign. The pictures have now been displayed on billboards throughout Beijing, the capital city of China. Given that scientists believe there are now at least three major trash islands in the Pacific Ocean alone, this project could not be more important or timely. The campaign’s tagline, “Responsibility Changes Pollution,” reminds each one of us of the pivotal role that we have to play in changing the situation.

** Please contact Christian Waters at waters@h20designsbeijing.com - he would like to add some details to our story** In an attempt to increase awareness for the plight of marine animals, WWF has launched a campaign entitled “The Price of Convenience” in collaboration with photographer Christian Waters, to show people exactly what happens to their trash when they’re done with it. In an interview with Refinery29, Waters explained why he was so compelled to draw attention to this problem: “People are basically using the oceans as their trash cans. I thought, maybe I can make a difference and try to create something that will help people change their lives and change how they act towards the creatures in the sea.” On a recent snorkeling expedition to Malaysia, Waters and his girlfriend were admiring the pristine blue sky and crystal-clear sea, when they began to notice pieces of trash floating around in the water. In addition to this distressing sight, Waters had also recently watched “a graphic and emotionally wrenching” video of someone attempting to remove a bendy straw from the nose of a sea turtle. “In such beautiful scenery, (the trash is) something so vile that just disrupts it,” Waters said. “I knew it only takes one piece of trash to kill one piece of wildlife, and it made me really upset.” Waters’ images are both stunning and horrifying, adding the perfect touch of urgency to WWF’s ad campaign. The pictures have now been displayed on billboards throughout Beijing, the capital city of China. Given that scientists believe there are now at least three major trash islands in the Pacific Ocean alone, this project could not be more important or timely. The campaign’s tagline, “Responsibility Changes Pollution,” reminds each one of us of the pivotal role that we have to play in changing the situation.

A férfit ez a videó is a fotózásra sarkallta, amin egy teknős orrából kellett eltávolítani egy szívószálat. Walker elmondta, hogy mivel szemét korábban ilyen mértékben nem létezett a vizekben, az állatok nem tudják, hogy az rossz, ők csak megeszik, amit találnak – mi emberek pedig egyre több, számukra életveszélyes anyagot szórunk az óceánokba.

Figyelem, a videóban a véres valóság látható!

Forrás: Metro